February, 2014 Electronic Magazine – Glossary A to Z Tuesday, May 20 2014 

Brittle paper (in rebinding): Paper that breaks when folded or crumpled. We don’t recommend regular rebinding this type of paper – we suggest visiting a conservator instead.

Buffered (Paper): Acid free and contains 2% calcium carbonate (or other compound) to act as a barrier to reduce future acid contamination.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand? Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!

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February 2013 E-Zine (V12#2): Define Monday, Feb 11 2013 

Acid Free (Paper): The use of this term varies from the logical definition of the individual words to a wide variety of standards – always have a company explain their definition See Also Archival webpage. Having no acidity and no residual acid-producing chemicals. Below is a definition from “Preserving Family Keepsakes Do’s and Don’ts”, Ilene Chandler Miller, 1996:

“Any paper that contains an alkaline (pH higher than 7 or an absence of acid) base and is often lignin-free.”

Acid Transfer: The act of acid migrating from one object or item to another.  See Also Archival webpage.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand?  Try us – contact us with your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!

January 2013 E-Zine (V12#1): Define Thursday, Jan 17 2013 

With a new year, it’s a good time to start over and run the definitions A-Z. This doesn’t mean that if new lingo comes to light before the review is over that we won’t throw it in!

Absorbent Paper (see Paper): Covering a variety of papers made for absorbing water and inks (degrees vary).  Examples: duplicating, filter, blotting and toweling papers.

*Acid Free Books (see Archival): The use of this term varies from the logical definition of the individual words to a wide variety of standards – always have a company explain their definition.  An acid free book depend on internal (book materials) and external factors (chemical processes, environment, etc.).  See Also Archival webpage.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand?  Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!

September 2005, V4#9: Production Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

A Little About Archival Quality

Internal Factors

The Gregath Publishing Company has a standard paper basis that all quotations and projects are based on unless the customer requests something different.  Our standard fine text paper is a 20/50#, uncoated, white, acid free paper.  This paper meets American National Standards Institute specifications for “Permanence of Paper”.  The paper is manufactured with chemical pulp under alkaline conditions.  Being of a very high benchmark (various ANSI and National Information Standards Organization standards), this paper meets these four basic requirements:

  • pH of 7.5-10 (balanced to archival)

  • A tear resistance of md index>5.25mNm2/6g which corresponds to a minimum of 40 gf.

  • Alkaline reserve: minimum of 2% calcium carbonate equivalent (buffered)

  • Less than 1% lignin (acidic)

This paper also earns “high” to “maximum” life expectancy for “Copies for Office Copying Machines” as established by ASTM International (formerly American Society for Testing and Materials).  This typically applies to xerocopy and digital grades.  While we have yet to find a published expected life span for permanent papers, ASTM suggests in their specification that paper meeting the high classification of this standard may be “usable” for 100 to 1,000 years.  Please note that the ASTM suggestion of usable means it can still be reproduced upon.  A reader can enjoy books printed on paper that is way past this “usable” stage of it’s life.

April 2005, V4#4: Marketing Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

You have paid for acid free paper and your books is “built to last” – don’t forget to include this in your list of positive selling points, when possible.  After all, the beautiful book you have produced cost you (and, by extension the customer) more than if it was on newsprint paper!  One place you always have a chance to mention this is in a press release.  You may choose other selling points for space use in paid advertisements and networking time and space.

April 2005, V4#4: Production Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Most of the work Gregath Publishing Company does in-house is offset printed.  We offset print on uncoated papers.  Uncoated papers have been traditionally classified by weight.  Interest has begun to increase also as to the brightness as well as archival nature.  As publishers, we have selected as our basis paper one that balances all of these issues while taking into account economy as well.  If a customer has a list of specifics, or even a particular brand/type of paper, we are happy to get paper mill quotes and pass the information on. 

Gregath’s standard book paper is a #50/60 uncoated white paper, acid free with a brightness of 84% – long grain.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/paper.html

March 2005, V4#3: Production Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Q. Will my book be archival and/or acid free?

A. It depends on how technical your definitions of acid free and/or archival are. This webpage has been provided for further education. Short Answer:  Our books meet several standards and are considered by many to be acid free. 

We utilize the offset printing method and/or digital copying and a variety of binding processes. These methods add a small percentage of acidic material while printing on any paper. We have yet to find any publishing process that is totally (100%) acid free, even if printed on high cotton (or “rag”) content, acid free paper. Additionally, the first bare hand that touches any acid free material also introduces acid to it.  However, by Gregath’s use of pH balanced paper (commonly referred to as “acid free”), your book will be over 99% acid free and will last for several decades – depending upon the owner’s treatment of the book.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/archival.html

March 2005, V4#3: Define Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Acid Free Books: The use of this term varies from the logical definition of the individual words to a wide variety of standards – always have a company explain their definition.  An acid free book depend on internal (book materials) and external factors (chemical processes, environment, etc.).  Because of varying factors, we do not use this term, see archival webpage for more information.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

March 2005, V4#3: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

A large number of genealogists are taking advantage of the resources of the internet.  Just because you can find a document or GEDCOM online today doesn’t mean it will be there (or free of charge) tomorrow or 20 years from now.  Because of this, it is a good idea to treat computer print outs for your files/archives to reduce their acid level as much as is comfortable implementing.  Here are a few tips:

  • use acid free paper

  • only print on one side

  • only run the paper through the printer once

  • if you don’t use only acid free paper, you might invest in a second printer that uses only acid free

  • when buying a new printer consider the composition of the ink it uses

  • if possible, take a “junk” print out from the printer and wet it down to test it’s water resistance – if it runs, you need to select another printer for your file copies

  • when making notations on the print outs, make sure to use archival quality ink pens (widely available, if in doubt – head for the scrapbooking section)

  • don’t use paperclips, staples, rubber bands, adhesive (unless archival and absolutely needed), post-it notes, etc.

  • store in acid free folders, etc.

  • keep temperature and humidity steady and comfortable.

For more information visit
http://www.gregathcompany.com/gstore.html
http://www.gregathcompany.com/sstore.html