Happy Easter Friday, Apr 2 2010 

Our offices are closed today.

From Our Family To Yours –

Happy Easter!!!

Our “Spring Break” Thursday, Mar 26 2009 

The front offices will be closed through Wednesday, April 1, 2009. Contact us through email, as that will be checked frequently during this time.

March 2009, V8#3: Production Monday, Mar 2 2009 

If sending file(s) online, contact us for full information – do not send by email.
The basic process is to  contact us for login information, then log into www.box.net using the information we will provide you. Next, you will double click open the file folder designated for you and then follow the upload directions on the screen. The final step is to email us explaining the upload is complete and how you are handling payment.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/crdprep.html

February 2009, V8#2: Genealogy Monday, Feb 16 2009 

Web Site Lists Missing World War II Soldiers

Approximately 74,000 World War II soldiers have not had their remains recovered or identified.  In an attempt to aid in the recovery and identification process, the Missing Personnel World War II database was created.  The database is online at www.dtic.mil/dpmo/WWII_MIA/index.htm.  This first-ever comprehensive list is a project of the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office and was completed in 2004. 

The database was created by comparing and analyzing two sources:  “Rosters of Military Personnel Whose Remains Were Not Recovered” and “The World War II Rosters of the Dead.”  All discrepancies were settled by using the National Archives and official personnel files.  The database contains the name of the missing soldier, service number, rank, branch of service and the date of loss. 

The accounting for missing World War II service members is an ongoing project.  As remains are recovered and identified, their names are removed from the database. 

When the war ended in August 1945, over 79,000 known soldiers were unaccounted for.  This number included individuals buried as “unknown” lost at sea and missing in action. 

There are similar databases for those missing from the Korean War, the Cold War, Vietnam and the Gulf War.  More information and access to these databases are found at www.dtic.mil/dpmo.

This information was taken from Paul Follett’s column Tree Tracers published in the Lawton Constitution on April 21, 2008 – via SWOGS.

Febrary 2009, V8#2: Marketing Monday, Feb 16 2009 

Free or nearly so:

Make your own coupons! These can be done in a variety of formats (flyers, brochures, book marks, business or post cards, etc.). Be sure to include all your contact information, the item in question, and something extra for the bearer. Coupons can be for a particular amount or % off, free or reduced shipping, an autographed copy, a mystery bonus (some imprinted advertising specialty), etc. The sky is the limit. Give the coupons out in person, leave them on freebie tables, tack them to bulletin boards, include them in correspondence, etc. Don’t forget to consider terms such as an expiration date and if the coupon needs to be surrendered.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/marketingfreeadvertising.html

 

 

February 2009, V8#2: Production Monday, Feb 16 2009 

If sending a hard copy manuscript, we suggest setting all margins (including any headers and footers) on a 8.5×11″ book at 1″. Generally a book printed from this would contain a 1.25″ binding/interior margin, and a .75″ trim/outside margin. “Fixing” the margins in this way is a free service we offer to make it easier on the manuscript preparation person.

Can you “cheat” the 1″ margin on a smaller format book and still have a pleasing balance of print and white space? Margins that leave less white space don’t have quite as pleasing a balance between printed and white space. Additionally, if the book is very thick, you can make a book with so small a margin that people are breaking it’s spine to read it. Outside margins differ between hard and soft binding selections, as they all have different minimum trim requirements.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/margins.html

June 2006, V5#6: Design Friday, Jan 30 2009 

While text that is justified at both right and left margins has a tidier effect, text that is justified on the left with a ragged right is actually easier to read.  This is due to the fact that all spacing is uniform and no words are broken to wrap onto the next line.  Both of these devices, though allowing uniform right and left edges, slow the reader’s eye down as the brain processes these differences.

January 2005, V4#1: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Fastback suggestions: With the fastback method, a spine imprint may be added, but not very economical on small publishings.  It may also be possible to use a wider variety of specialty covers economically.  With the fastback method there are a limited number of fabric colors available for the spine – one can design their cover to either contrast or match the spine.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/sb/index.html

February 2005, V4#2: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Photo thoughts: The author, will be the person with the final say as to what  goes into the printed book.  While many families would love to see every photo available in print, this is rarely economical.  Because of this, the author may have some major decisions on what “makes the cut”.  Final decisions should include not only the quality and subject of the photograph, which may effect the tone of the picture page, but also who is in the photo.  Economically, printed photographs will be black and white.  Since not everyone has an eye for what color photos will look like in black and white, the author may get an idea by converting it.  They can either digitize it and change the color file to grayscale, or place the photo on a b/w copy machine.  A color picnic picture in a sun dappled glade may seem perfect in composition, tone, and quality, but may not be a very good black and white.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://gregathcompany.com/udo.html

February 2004, V3#2: Marketing Monday, Jan 26 2009 

Paid Advertising:

Display advertising can work to ones advantage. National advertising is well worth the effort and cost.  A one column, one inch long display advertisement in a genealogical magazine that is circulated nationally or internationally will usually bring a good response.  Depending on your target audience, display advertisement has been known to bring more interest then the same information placed in the classifieds or even marketplaces.  Advertising rates are usually published in each issue and can vary greatly from publication to publication. The same advertisement may be placed in target newspapers and topical (genealogy, Civil War, hobby, geographically targeted, etc.) magazines. 

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This section is drawn from our online marketing advice at http://gregathcompany.com/marketing.html 

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