February 2009, V8#2: Genealogy Monday, Feb 16 2009 

Web Site Lists Missing World War II Soldiers

Approximately 74,000 World War II soldiers have not had their remains recovered or identified.  In an attempt to aid in the recovery and identification process, the Missing Personnel World War II database was created.  The database is online at www.dtic.mil/dpmo/WWII_MIA/index.htm.  This first-ever comprehensive list is a project of the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office and was completed in 2004. 

The database was created by comparing and analyzing two sources:  “Rosters of Military Personnel Whose Remains Were Not Recovered” and “The World War II Rosters of the Dead.”  All discrepancies were settled by using the National Archives and official personnel files.  The database contains the name of the missing soldier, service number, rank, branch of service and the date of loss. 

The accounting for missing World War II service members is an ongoing project.  As remains are recovered and identified, their names are removed from the database. 

When the war ended in August 1945, over 79,000 known soldiers were unaccounted for.  This number included individuals buried as “unknown” lost at sea and missing in action. 

There are similar databases for those missing from the Korean War, the Cold War, Vietnam and the Gulf War.  More information and access to these databases are found at www.dtic.mil/dpmo.

This information was taken from Paul Follett’s column Tree Tracers published in the Lawton Constitution on April 21, 2008 – via SWOGS.

Febrary 2009, V8#2: Marketing Monday, Feb 16 2009 

Free or nearly so:

Make your own coupons! These can be done in a variety of formats (flyers, brochures, book marks, business or post cards, etc.). Be sure to include all your contact information, the item in question, and something extra for the bearer. Coupons can be for a particular amount or % off, free or reduced shipping, an autographed copy, a mystery bonus (some imprinted advertising specialty), etc. The sky is the limit. Give the coupons out in person, leave them on freebie tables, tack them to bulletin boards, include them in correspondence, etc. Don’t forget to consider terms such as an expiration date and if the coupon needs to be surrendered.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/marketingfreeadvertising.html

 

 

February 2009, V8#2: Production Monday, Feb 16 2009 

If sending a hard copy manuscript, we suggest setting all margins (including any headers and footers) on a 8.5×11″ book at 1″. Generally a book printed from this would contain a 1.25″ binding/interior margin, and a .75″ trim/outside margin. “Fixing” the margins in this way is a free service we offer to make it easier on the manuscript preparation person.

Can you “cheat” the 1″ margin on a smaller format book and still have a pleasing balance of print and white space? Margins that leave less white space don’t have quite as pleasing a balance between printed and white space. Additionally, if the book is very thick, you can make a book with so small a margin that people are breaking it’s spine to read it. Outside margins differ between hard and soft binding selections, as they all have different minimum trim requirements.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/margins.html

February 2009, V8#2: Design Monday, Feb 16 2009 

There is no “silver bullet” for proper publication design or format. However, there are some very basic rules to get you ready to go:

Don’t

  • Don’t do anything in your book that you hate to come across, as a reader or a researcher.

  • Don’t over clutter pages, often trying to reduce publication expense.

  • Don’t use small type if you want older people to enjoy your work.

  • Don’t give up.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design