Blueline: For Gregath use, see ARC.  Below is a definition from “The What Shall I Write Handbook”, Corrine Russell, 1992, that is a good addition to our ARC entry:

“Bluelines are page proofs. They represent your last chance to review copy looking for errors.  Depending on the printing process your printer uses, bluelines may be expensive to produce, and many printers will not provide them unless you request them.  If printers do provide them, they may be expensive, so ask first.  Bluelines may be a good idea if you have a lot of photographs, for bluelines present your only opportunity to see photographs in place.  Check them carefully.  Make sure they are in the correct position, and that they are not upside down or turned backward.  Because bluelines are so expensive to produce, now is the time to start editing and proofreading. Unless they are printer’s errors, changes made at this point cost you dearly.”

ARC (Advanced Reading Copy): A sample publication produced with author/customer submitted material.  Many times this is in an alternate binding (or unbound with small publications) than the main publishing.  The reproduction process is usually not the same as the main printing (100+) and therefore differences in quality, text block placement, etc. may occur between the ARC and the published book.  For POD, however, this gives the customer the chance to see the quality of photograph the supplied material will produce.  Since Gregath works mainly from submitted camera ready copy, an ARC is generally not necessary.  Our quality guarantee covers any printer error (such as upside down photos) that may occasionally occur.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

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