November 2003, V2#11: Market Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

Press release tip – With so much information that can be included, adhere to the “mini-skirt rule” – keep it short (as possible) while not sacrificing content.

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This section is drawn from our online marketing advice at http://www.gregathcompany.com/marketing.html

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November 2003, V2#11: Production Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

Digital/POD

Once the digital manuscript has cleared pre-press it is ready for production.  The file or files are sent to the digital machine directly from the front office computers.  The book block is printed out already collated.  Depending on the size of the book and publication quantity, the digital files may be printed out in smaller page sequences and hand collated in preparation for binding.  Additionally, special items such as 4-color, slick inserts and card dividers are added by hand as well – as required.

November 2003, V2#11: Design Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

Once you’ve decided to include photographs, check with your printer/publisher as to the procedure they want you to use.  This can be done before or after you choose the exact photos.  We request authors arrange pictures on each page for placement, and copy the page (to help make sure there are no mistakes later). Photos (or print outs) should remain unattached to the page (or to each other), with placement and page ID on reverse of the photo. Example: 3 photos on page 23 marked/IDed 23a, 23b, and 23c. Post-It notes are becoming popular for this type of identification. The manuscript page should have identical photo placement notations. All photos should be grouped and placed in the top of the manuscript box, before sending to the printer. If applicable, be sure to specify what is the most important subject when alterations are required. IF you are providing the half-tones, they should be trimmed and affixed to (or produced/saved as part of) the manuscript page, as a part of the camera ready manuscript,  to avoid additional expense.  

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/tips.html

November 2003, V2#11: Define Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

Hardbound (hard back, hard cover): Books that are have a binding material covered “board” affixed to the glued and/or sewn book block.  Several different methods can be used. 

We employ – Library Oversewn (see http://www.gregathcompany.com/lohb/index.html and covered with the binding material of your choice, over .98 binding boards.

Standard Buckram Hardbinding: see above – binding material is buckram with a free spine imprint and free single line front cover imprint – usually gold foil.

Deluxe/Executive Hardbinding: see above – binding material is usually Lexitone with free spine imprint including bars and free custom (no larger than 6×9″) front imprint – variety of inks & foils available.
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For other printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossary at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html

October 2003, V2#10: Define Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

Halftone (also equivalent to PMT, etc.): An image taken from your photo that has a dot pattern laid on it for better reproduction. Without the correct dot pattern, the photo would look like a bad copy machine copy. Many of today’s newer copiers automatically lay a pattern, thus better copies.
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For other printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossary at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html

October 2003, V2#10: Production & Design Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

There are several real problems concerning reproducing pictures that authors may not be aware of. The very best reproduction processes lose some quality from the original. Some “antique” photos are sent to the printers that are barely discernible as pictures. These pictures should be taken to a professional restorer or computer graphic whiz (with a high quality photo quality printer), first. Remember that the printer can do many miracles with size, but most are not set up to restore faded photos. Any old, faded photos sent to the printer will only result in faded print and possibly disappointment.

If you are preparing a manuscript for publication, take a critical look at the pictures. Do they show the detail you want? Is there too much unwanted background? Are the faces too light? Too dark? In many cases, there are no better pictures of the subject and in some cases, no others at all. In these cases, the question is, Can they be enhanced? Quite often, the answer is yes! In most major cities, a trip to the yellow pages will find a photo restorer. When you have photos reproduced, compare them closely with the originals. Often the reproducer, to improve contrast, loses detail.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://gregathcompany.com/tips.html 

October 2003, V2#10: Market Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

As with email lists, check online for bulletin boards or discussion groups having to do with your subject matter.  After getting an idea of how information flows, post information about your book.

September 2003, V2#9: Market Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

Press release tip – Include background on the author, writing, and subject matter to some extent.

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This section is drawn from our online marketing advice at http://www.gregathcompany.com/marketing.html 

September 2003, V2#9: Production Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

ISBN stands for International Standard Book Number and is usually associated with the barcode on the back of books.  This number is assigned to a publication from the “publisher’s” prefix group – ultimately from R. R. Bowker – http://www.bowker.com.  A number only applies to the publication from that publisher in that format only.  In other words, if you have an ISBN on a hardbound book, your softbound edition can’t use the same number.  Some printers have numbers that can either be used for free, or for a small fee for publications.  Additionally, regardless of who produces the book, you can purchase your own block of numbers.  This may help if you don’t plan to stay with the same production company.  If you use printer A’s ISBN for the first edition and for your second printing use printer B – you can not use printer A’s ISBN on the second edition.  For more information, check out Bowker’s site above.

September 2003, V2#9: Design Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

While crop for effect (as mentioned last month) is usually a little more expensive at most publishing houses, we perform this service to some extent, free of charge and the end result is much more gratifying. Our professionals will choose exactly where the half-tone should be cropped and/or enlarged/reduced at no additional charge to you.  After all, are you trying to show Uncle Ed or the yard he was standing in? Of course, there are times when the background IS the picture. We also receive instructions to enlarge or reduce to a specified size without cropping and it is physically impossible to comply, because without cropping, the size specified cannot be reached from the original without warping the outcome. Enlargement or reduction can only be done overall, not in only one direction. When we face such a problem, we use the largest dimension, and let the smaller fall where it may. [If 3″x5″ is specified, when we get to the 5″ measurement, the requested 3″ may be less than 3″.] If an author prefers total control over their sizing and cropping, this can also be done with us at an additional charge in-house or they can send exactly what they want and mark “same size originals” at no additional cost.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/tips.html