December 2006, V5#12: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

Don’t forget to ask for family data updates in your end of year holiday mailings. So many of us put off adding family information to our working files because it can be done later. Sometimes this turns into loosing information. Remember to include your new family data in these mailings as well. This can be done as a separate sheet that can be easily discarded for those non-genealogy oriented family members.

Advertisements

November 2006, V5#11: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

Check with your local library, even if they don’t have a large genealogy section, to see what online services they offer. Don’t stop with your hometown library! Check other libraries that neighbor your “home” library’s service area. Not all library’s are aware of what other near by library’s offer. It may be worth a trip to get a library card for the services the offer from their website that you can take advantage from your home computer.

October 2006, V5#10: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

Part of a genealogy or history related service or social organization? Consider having an ancestor round table. Everyone bring their knowledge and an ancestor. In turn, each give a brief case study of the ancestor and ask for suggestions of your fellows. If you have enough members interested, it could even be open to the public as a membership event, or fund raiser.

September 2006, V5#9: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

Every Genealogist Needs a Will by Frederick E. Moss, J.D., LL.M
Do you have a current will?  We may not all have extensive property or possessions to dispose of but there are other benefits that can be realized by expressing our desires through a last will and testament.  If you have minor children, you may suggest a more appropriate guardian than a court might appoint in the absence of your direction.  If you nominate an executor you can trust, you may reduce the expenses taken out of your estate by waiving bond and accounting.  These and other measures your attorney may suggest can insure that taxes and other charges are minimized that would otherwise reduce the estate available to your intended beneficiaries.
 Genealogists may have come to appreciate the value of wills as a source of information to future generations.  Lawyers will normally include the basic information declaring the testator’s name and domicile and will address the testator’s wishes for the disposition of his property to named beneficiaries.  Our legal training will not always direct our attention to the information-sharing and preservation opportunity that the drafting of a will provides.

Discuss with your lawyer the possibility of including what I have called a three-generation declaration similar to the following:

 
“I, Joseph Abraham Moss, was born the 23d day of January 1853 in Gordon County, Georgia the son of Johnson Moss and the former Sarah Caroline Love.  I married Charlotte Jane Roberson, the daughter of Thomas Howery Roberson and the former Emaline Lewis, on the 5th day of January 1873 in Crawford County, Arkansas.  Our son, Thomas Johnson Moss was born the 8th day of December 1875 in Crawford County, Arkansas.  Our son, James Monroe Moss was born the 26th day of September 1876 in Crawford County, Arkansas. Our daughter, Sarah Emaline Moss was born the 27th day of September 1878 in Crawford County, Arkansas.  Our daughter, Mary Inez Moss was born the 30th day of March 1880 in Crawford County, Arkansas. . . .”
 
There may be circumstances where it may be inappropriate to go into this level of detail and you should do so only with special care for insuring the accuracy of the information provided.  Although wills become public records when admitted to probate upon the death of the testator, triggering our sensitivities about publishing data on living individuals, the limited distribution these papers normally receive minimizes the risk of abuse.  
 
But if you do chose to do so, to paraphrase Proverbs, the genealogists among your great-grandchildren will rise up and call you blessed. 
From Federation of Genealogical Societies “FGS Delegate Digest”  Volume 13, No. 9, July 2006

August 2006, V5#8: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

FAMILY HEALTH HISTORY: Know your past; protect your future! 

This summer as you plan for family reunions, don’t forget to take time to talk about your family health history. Family reunions are the perfect time to learn about and share, not only your genealogy but your family health history as well. And for some families, knowing this information could be life-saving. This is because many health problems like heart disease, asthma, cancer, and diabetes tend to run in families. When close family members have the same health problem or develop a problem at a younger age than expected, this can increase other family members’ risk of developing the problem. But the good news is, by learning about your family health history, you can make healthy choices to lower your risk.
 To help families talk about and share their family health history, the Utah Department of Health developed a free Family Health History Toolkit. The toolkit contains a pedigree chart, fun ideas, and talking points you can use with family members to collect about your family health history. 
 
To get a free Family Health History Toolkit visit www.health.utah.gov/genomics or call the Health Resource Line at 1-888-222-2542.

From Federation of Genealogical Societies “FGS Delegate Digest”  Volume 13, No. 9, July 2006

June 2006, V5#6: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

In the world of MP3 players and multi-media computers, consider looking into podcasts for further information. The Genealogy Guys do a weekly podcast (broadcast online that can be listened to at any time/on demand) that is a pleasure to listen to – as well as having great genealogy information. If you are an oral learner (you have to be told, rather than reading, or experimenting), podcasts are a blessing, and many can be accessed at no fee. Do you find you have the radio on most of the time “in the background”? Download a podcast – or several – and you’ll have the most effective “learning by osmosis” as you can get. Podcasts can be found online for a variety of subjects – even computers and software. This can also be a targeted value added service if played at a customer service related venue. The patrons of the Muskogee, Oklahoma Library (Genealogy Department) already enjoy this feature! Search podcasts out with your favorite search engine, or query your eList(s) for recommendations.

April 2006, V5#4: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

Dollarhide’s Rules for Genealogy
///////////////////////////////
Thanks to: William Dollarhide http://www.dollarhide.org/page_billw.htm

“Always interview brothers and sisters together in the same room — since they can’t agree on anything about the family tree, it makes for
great fun to see who throws the first punch.”

“It is a known fact that St. Peter checks all your Family Group Sheets for accuracy before you are allowed to enter the Pearly Gates.”

Previously published in RootsWeb Review: 23 November 2005, Vol. 8, No. 47.

March 2006, V5#3: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

Always be sure to double check with your library to see if they participate in an inter-library loan program. Many books/microform, etc. you may be interested in researching from may be available through one of these programs. Many libraries do ask for payment to help defray postage for this service.

February 2006, V5#2: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

Always be aware of nicknames and name derivatives.  While looking for Gertie, don’t discount any Marguerites, etc.  Even if the family tradition states that Mel is a person’s given Christian name, don’t ignore a Melvin if its near the right place and/or time.

January 2006, V5#1: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

While no staff has tried this resource, a group of researchers have started a business to help locate and obtain UK (England & Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) birth, marriage or death certificates.

http://www.bmd-certificates.co.uk – no longer a good link

This is a Pay Service, and we do not endorse this site and their services in any way.  This is an FYI resource listing.

Next Page »