July 2005, V4#7: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Send pictures via email without attachments

Most folks learn early how to send photos by attachment with emails.  However, not everyone opens attachments due to virus concerns.  What to do?  Find out how to embed the photo in the email itself.  Please find general Outlook Express instructions below (NOTE: all choices listed below will not be available unless you are in an outgoing email box/window):

Double check to see your are in html email format by clicking the “Format” pull down menu – a dot should be by Rich Text (HTML) – if it is not, click it and the dot will move.  Next, place your cursor in the email where you want the photo to go, then click the “Insert” menu and choose picture – this will bring up a “Picture” window from which you will click the “Browse” button.  This brings up an “Open” window.  In this window, you will go through your files to find the one you want to use.  Once you have selected the file, click the “Open” button at the bottom of the window, then click the “OK” button.  This should place your photo where your cursor was.

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June 2005, V4#6: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Information about ISBN’s can now be found at http://www.isbn.org with the older address of http://www.bowker.com listed in an earlier edition.

May 2005, V4#5: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

The Library of Congress Copyright office can now be found at http://www.copyright.gov with the older address of http://www.loc.gov/copyright listed in an earlier edition.

April 2005, V4#4: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

What time is it!?!

Don’t forget to double check your computer clock around daylight savings time.  Many things about a computer system may cause you problems if your clock setting is very far off – say an hour.  If you’ve moved your computer, or had a massive electrical outage, you will need to manually adjust your clock as well.  Most newer systems automatically adjust for daylight savings time, but if your computer doesn’t, here’s how to fix it:

From the desktop, select (click or double click – depending on your set up) “my computer”, select “control panel”, select “date and time” – this should bring up the date/time window.  Click in the time box and change the time (you can also drag the clock hands).  While you have the window open, you may want to look around in the box (and tabs).  If your computer didn’t adjust at daylight savings time, there may be a simple check box you can click so it will adjust in the future.  Likewise, if you are in an area that doesn’t observe DST and your computer is switching on you, you can click the box to deselect this option.

March 2005, V4#3: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

A large number of genealogists are taking advantage of the resources of the internet.  Just because you can find a document or GEDCOM online today doesn’t mean it will be there (or free of charge) tomorrow or 20 years from now.  Because of this, it is a good idea to treat computer print outs for your files/archives to reduce their acid level as much as is comfortable implementing.  Here are a few tips:

  • use acid free paper

  • only print on one side

  • only run the paper through the printer once

  • if you don’t use only acid free paper, you might invest in a second printer that uses only acid free

  • when buying a new printer consider the composition of the ink it uses

  • if possible, take a “junk” print out from the printer and wet it down to test it’s water resistance – if it runs, you need to select another printer for your file copies

  • when making notations on the print outs, make sure to use archival quality ink pens (widely available, if in doubt – head for the scrapbooking section)

  • don’t use paperclips, staples, rubber bands, adhesive (unless archival and absolutely needed), post-it notes, etc.

  • store in acid free folders, etc.

  • keep temperature and humidity steady and comfortable.

For more information visit
http://www.gregathcompany.com/gstore.html
http://www.gregathcompany.com/sstore.html

February 2005, V4#2: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Color photos in black and white

Wonder what a color photograph would look like as a black and white print?  No need to wonder!  Digitize your photograph with the method of your choice (scan or take a digital photo of it).  Open the graphics program of your choice (MS Paintbrush, Photoshop, PrintArtist, etc.) and look around in the different menus.  Open your color photograph file.  Most, if not all, graphics programs will have an area that shows your color photograph as color (or RGB, CYMK, etc.).  In or near this notation there will be a way to change it to grayscale.  For computer beginners a quick way to define Grayscale (computer speak) for “black and white photograph”, while black and white options will drop out all gray tones and convert color to either black or white.  Choose grayscale and read and answer any computer dialog boxes that come up carefully (such as “do you want to discard color data”).  Remember as long as you don’t save your changes over the original file, you can try almost anything without loosing your original file.  Once the photo is “black and white” (grayscale) you’ll know if it will look good, bad, or OK in b/w print.  You can save this file over the original color or “save as” a different name, etc.

January 2005, V4#1: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Photoshop light photo edit

Do you have a digitized photograph that is nice, but has specks or small cracks in the background? If so, open the file in Adobe Photoshop.  Next, check to make sure your tools toolbar is visible (click “window”, if there isn’t a checkmark by “tools”, click it).  On the tools toolbar there is a clone stamp tool (the icon looks like a rubber stamper) that you click to select. Notice the bar under the pull down menus now reflects all the clone tool options.  Move your mouse near an imperfect spot (the size of the circle is controlled by the brush button at the top).  You may choose to play with the options to get what works best for you and the photo. Caution – in Photoshop you can only undo the last step.  Place the circle over an area that looks generally how the background “under” the imperfection should look.  While holding down the ALT key, left click your mouse.  Now move the circle over the imperfection (or part of it) and click.  A copy/clone of the ALT+click background replaces the imperfection.  You can repeat the steps as needed.  This generally works great with backgrounds because, as a rule, they are not too intricate. This method may also work to some extent on the subjects but is it much trickier.

December 2004, V3#12: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Alternate Searching

Stuck at a roadblock and just sure your information isn’t online?  If you try different search strategies, you may “get lucky”.  Especially if researching an ethnicity, consider adding or substituting the “foreign” word for English such as the Dutch word for birth or born if looking for a Dutch birth record.

November 2004, V3#11: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Change your screen saver

Right click any empty space on your desktop (what you see when you turn your computer on).  Click “properties” – when the box comes up, click the screen saver tab at the top of the box.  There is a scroll box (with down arrow on the right side) that contains lots of options.  Once you have picked one you like (they preview in the box), you might take the time to explore the other options the box provides.  Last step is to click the OK button.

October 2004, V3#10: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Change your wallpaper

Right click any empty space on your desktop (what you see when you turn your computer on).  Click “properties” – when the box comes up, click the wall paper tab at the top of the box.  There is a scroll box (with down arrow on the right side) that contains lots of options.  Once you have picked one you like (they preview in the box), you might take the time to explore the other options the box provides.  Last step is to click the OK button.

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